PGD The law regulation about aided procreation in Poland proposed by deputy Gowin, arouses a lot of controversies and will probably become a start for many ethical and law discussions. Not many people, no matter if they are pro or against using this medical procedure to cure infertility, deny the need to determine the rules of dealing with reproductive cells and foetal and embryonic tissues when taking into account the number of children who were born with the help of methods of aided procreation. But the determination of these rules requires discussion about many ethical problems that result from in vitro procedure being used now, like for example problems with criteria to access to the programme, with usage of gamete donation, with practising pre-implantation diagnostics, with limited number of moved embryos and freezing ‘additional’ embryos. My main goal is to point the ethical problems regarding only one of the aspects of aided procreation, which is PGD. However, before I will get to the essence of the matter, we need to indicate two objections. First of all, the intensity of information about moral matters of the current medicine in context of the beginnings of the human life is huge and has a lot of threads connected with each other. It is enough to mention that the area of possible questions applies to such fundamental and ethical issues as the way of interpreting the significance of human life, the right to live and human dignity, moral status of impregnated egg cell and conditions of doing medical experiments on human being. In the context of aided procreation and the acknowledging the infertility as a social disease, important is a debate about the definition of health and moral right of human being, especially the right to make conscious procreation decisions, the exploitation of medical prospects in order to safe human health, equal access to medical treatment and to all information about the health which could have influence on the decisions made by a patient. Second of all, the problem of pre-implantation diagnostics is hard to isolate from bigger ethical questions, connected with the possibility of practical usage of achievements of genetic medicine, especially in the area of prevention of diseases that are genetically determined. I have in mind the issue of morally allowable methods of prevention of coming to the world people that have defective genetic ‘equipment’, right methods of conducting the genetic counselling, the conditions of using the prenatal diagnostics, pre-symptomatic and genetic tests, and genetic therapy. Present and...